Naloxone Empowers Family

Opioid addiction is becoming so widespread it is living on the streets, in our parks, on our beaches, and in our restaurants. Drug addiction is no longer something that happens on dark corners, in alley ways, or flop houses. Today the drug epidemic is worldwide and is in public. Areas have been heavily affected by the opioid epidemic, more than others. Addiction is no longer an issue of us versus them. Increasing amount of personal reports have humanized the often shamed and stigmatized disorder of addiction. It is easier to recognize now that addiction is something that can happen to anybody, as well can mental health. Everyone is struggling with something, just some at a higher degree than others. Together, we can act as supporters and caregivers, increasing our compassion for one another. We can recognize when someone needs help and instead of separate ourselves we can be the first to respond, possibly to save a life.

Naloxone is an opioid overdose reversal drug. It can be administered via nasal inhalation, called Narcan, with a quick spurt up the nostril. Someone who is on the brink of death due to overdosing on opioids can be instantaneously brought back to life and met with empathetic people. Naloxone is able to reverse opioid overdose because it is an opioid antagonist. Opioid antagonists are part of popular medication assisted therapy drugs  because they bind to opioid receptors, blocking hard opioid drugs like heroin or fentanyl from continuing to do so. As a result, naloxone prevents the effects of opioid overdose to continue because the opioid neurotransmitters cannot make it through any longer and stop producing. Respiratory depression is a term used to describe the experience of the breath shallowing to such a slow rate the heart simply stops. When someone’s breathing has neared that point, naloxone can bring them back to life. Due to the intoxicating and body numbing effect of opioid drugs, most people do not recognize when their breathing is slowing to a dangerous rate.

New research in the Drug And Alcohol Review found that out of 4,373 recovery attempts performed by family members using Naloxone on their opioid-overdosing loved ones, 20 percent, 98 percent of those attempts were successful.

Having a plan for treatment is essential in addition to maintaining the momentum of life caused by Naloxone. While Naloxone does reverse the effect of opioids it does not instantaneously detox the body of opioids. Experiencing the symptoms of withdrawal, someone out of an overdose needs stabilization and treatment.

 

Sound Recovery Solutions offers stabilization services for sub acute detox and a continuum of partial care programs with boarding options to create a foundation for living sober. Our programs empower addicts in recovery to become leaders in their own lives and the communities of recovery around them. For information, call us today at (561) 666-7427.

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